News

Black History Month 2024

Activities, HIV

February 1st is here again, announcing the beginning of Black History Month. ACCM will honor Black History Month by uplifting the voices of Black HIV activists throughout the month to celebrate the people, their work and their impact on our community. Keep an eye on our social media for a chance to learn about our history and our leaders through our HIV & Activism series.

As an HIV organization we must recognize that Black, Indigenous and POC communities are disproportionately affected by HIV. We also wish to recognize that the voices of Black people (as well as Indigenous and POC communities) are often silenced and disregarded.

We will gather all of the information we will be posting across social media here as a centralized location to highlight and remember the work we are doing. You can come back to this post, as we will be updating it weekly throughout the month of February.

Afro Drag is back!

February 21st, 8pm-10pm Bar Le Cocktail
The venue is wheelchair accessible
Tix $15 https://www.tickettailor.com/events/softxpower/1146890
Masks are strongly encouraged

Featuring an all star line up of Montreal’s finest talents
EnvytheClown , Dream Loubotin , @jontaemccrory , @bebe_elle69 , @muz_emma, @missstellastone , @official_jayshow_drag , @jaqqstrapp , Uncle Marley , @fallintodesire

Hosted by @da_bigsissy and @aizyssebagaz
Sound and tunes by @djbugo

Gina Brown

Gina Brown shares her story with the National AIDS Memorial Surviving Voices oral history project, which in 2017 focused on women and HIV/AIDS. 

Gina Brown is a community organizer with the Southern AIDS Coalition. She has worked in the field of HIV for more than 15 years and has been living with HIV for more than 23 years. 

https://www.aidsmemorial.org/post/gina-brown

Sylvester James

Sylvester James (1947-1988) was in some ways an unlikely star: an androgynous, cross-dressing, openly gay, African American, falsetto-singing, unapologetically flaming man-diva influenced primarily by church women, black blues singers, drag queens, hippies, and homosexuals. In the 1970s and 80s, Sylvester rode his marginality right into the mainstream–a star not despite the boundaries of race, gender, and sexuality he crossed but because of them–becoming an international disco sensation and an enduring icon of queer self-determination.

Sylvester rode to stardom on the wave of liberation movements that shared with him a taste for the strange, the over-the-top, the fantastical, and that aimed, like him, for pleasure, self- determination, shamelessness, and the ecstasy of blurred boundaries. He embodied a simple set of diva-driven inspirational imperatives that have continued to inspire: be free; be fabulous; be real. The San Francisco-based singer’s “You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)” became the soundtrack of sexual and gender liberation movements largely because it articulated a revolution you could dance to.

Sylvester Celebrates. This video, courtesy of the GLBT Historical Society, includes live performances by Sylvester, including his performance at his 40th birthday celebration and at the 1985 Cable Car Awards.

https://www.aidsmemorial.org/post/sylvester


You can view the our posts from previous years here: 2023, 2022.